I am excited to share some of the amazing photography coming from our photojournalists at the Global Press Journal

I am honored and excited to share some of the powerful photography being created by the photojournalists at the Global Press Journal.   It is such a pleasure to get to be their editor and to work with their wonderful images every day, getting to see their communities through the eyes of those who know and understand them best.   I will continue to share some of their images and photo essays as we publish them, so you can enjoy their amazing work as well.

You can see all of the work of our journalists and photojournalists on the Global Press Journal website.  http://www.globalpressjournal.com/   It is a great site to visit as part of your daily news consumption, because you will get direct access to the unique GPJ stories and content that show a side of many communities and countries that are not traditionally covered in the media.  Since our content is also syndicated by many of the world’s top newswires and publications, such as Reuters and UPI, you may sometimes see our stories being re-published by any number of international news outlets as well.

This beautiful photo essay is about a remote village in Nepal that is being forced to relocate due to lack of water.  by Nepalese photojournalist Shilu Manandhar.

http://www.globalpressjournal.com/asia/nepal/desperate-water-all-residents-remote-nepalese

Here are just some of the wonderful images from her essay.  All images copyright GPJ

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Mountains and cliffs surround Samzong, which is located close to Nepal’s border with Tibet.

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Dolker Gurung, 3, embraces her mother while she prepares lunch for the family. Food shortages are now common here

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Dolker Gurung’s mother, who declined to be interviewed, weaves a carpet in her yard.

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There are no roads, just rough lanes, to Samzong. People can access the village only by foot or on horse.

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The Samzong Khola, the only river that flows through the village, depends mostly on snowfall. Because of climate change, the river is no longer sufficient for residents to irrigate their fields.

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Tsedhup Gurung keeps his cattle in the shed after rearing them. Stockbreeding is becoming residents’ other source of livelihood.

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There are 17 households in Samzong. All families are planning to leave by summer 2014 because water has become scarce.

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Cristi Hegranes is awarded the Grinnell Prize for social justice for her work with GPI!

I am so proud to announce that Cristi has received this award for her work in the creation of the Global Press Institute, and for she has done to advance the lives of women reporters and the role they play in international journalism.

Here is a video that was produced about our work in Nepal, which I think does a wonderful job capturing the inspiring work Cristi has been doing since she started GPI.

It is a complete honor to get to work with Cristi, and Maura, and the rest of the GPI family, and to be able to provide photography training so that they can begin to produce powerful images as another tool for them to tell important stories from their communities.

We have a lot in the works around this photojournalism program so stay tuned!   And congratulations again to Cristi, you truly are an inspiration to all of us.

I love the GPI Nepal Newsdesk. Thank you for an inspiring week!

What an amazing week in Nepal!  I have come away with a wonderful group of new friends and collegues and I am feeling really great about the training program and portrait project with GPI.  This was the first time I tried the condensed version of the curriculum to see if we could teach much of the basics of photography and photojournalism over two half day sessions.  Would it be enough so that I could leave them with their new camera and they could begin to practice taking pictures for their stories?    The class went really well, thanks in large part to my amazing students.

GPI Nepal newsdesk and trainers

The GPI reporters are such bright and highly motivated women, so even when there was a complicated technical explanation, they were very interested in understanding it and they kept asking questions until they got it.   Rachana, our translater did a great job helping me to bring the material to life with her energy and enthusiasm.   It is particularly rewarding to be training women, some of whom are also mothers like myself, who feel such a passion for journalism and for telling important stories about their communities.

It was again a reminder about all we take for granted in the United States, especially the opportunity to go to school and learn any skill we want.   That I have this opportunity to pass on what I have learned to those who don’t have those same resources feels like a gift.  I was touched by the level of appreciation and love they conveyed to me for giving them the photo training, and it made me feel even more honored by the opportunity.   I am really blessed.

Cristi was also training several new journalists during the week we were there, so I got to see the fresh perspectives and enthusiasm that they are bringing to the Nepal staff.  I sat in on a pitch meeting while they shared all of their many ideas for upcoming stories, ranging from domestic violence to environment issues and health concerns for women in Nepal.

Tara, the Nepal editor, and Cristi listening to the reporters pitching their stories

Kathmandu was a great experience, but as someone who loves the mountains, it was tough to see them off in the distance and not be able to go explore the country.   Everyone kept telling me I should get out and see the rest of Nepal, but work kept us in the city this time and so I will just have to plan to go back one day to see my new friends and for some adventure in the country.    Rachana invited me to come back and go white water rafting on a river which tour books call “suicidal”, but which she promises isn’t really that dangerous because as she says, she does it all the time.   We’ll see how brave I’m feeling.  I already survived a ride on the back of her moto, dogding traffic in Kathmandu, so maybe that will be the next adventure.

mountains of Nepal from Kathmandu

Now that we have officially kicked off this project I look forward to meeting more of the talented GPI reporters from around the world and also the professional female photographers who have agreed to help me in bringing this training to all 25 GPI newsdesks.   That potential of mentorship and friendship among women storytellers is one of the things that excites me most!   I can’t wait.